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Antifa / BLM / BLM Activist: "There Is One Common Enemy, The White Man"
« Last post by smallengineshop on July 21, 2020, 04:18:03 PM »
Can a Leftist build anything without stepping on others, without hurting others? I don't think I have ever seen a happy Leftist or Marxist.

Exclusive Video: BLM Activist Says White Men Are ‘The Common Enemy’, ‘We Need to Get Rid of Them’

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/9mMSb8uoMaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/9mMSb8uoMaA</a>
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Antifa / BLM / Media Are Your Enemy - Cop Murdered By BLM Activist
« Last post by smallengineshop on July 15, 2020, 09:43:24 PM »
Click on image to view article:


Black Lives Matter activist, Henry E. Washington, shot and killed police officer, Jonathan Shoop, and injured another police officer Monday night in Washington state. Major news outlets are silent about the story, but no surprise there.
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UTI has added several new automotive programs to their line-up that are cheaper than the original UTI automotive repair program. I don't know when the change occured, but I noticed the new programs in their most recent 2020 catalog. The new programs are only available at some UTI campuses, so download the school catalog to find out what's taught at which campus. Here is the catalog download page for UTI and MMI

UTI And MMI Catalogs

The first new program is called Automotive Essentials Technology 2 (AET2) and is taught at the UTI Avondale campus. It may also be taught at other locations so check the catalog. AET2 is based on the regular automotive repair program, but without the 3 Power & Performance classes called AT12-150 Power & Performance 1 Engine Build, AT12-151 Power & Performance 2 Bolt On Performance and AT12-203 Power & Performance 3 Computer Performance Testing. At the Avondale campus the AET2 program is combined with one manufacturer elective, either Ford FACT or GM ASEP, and is about $7K cheaper than if you combined these manufacturer electives with the regular automotive repair program. I don't know if AET2 can be taken by itself without a manufacturer elective.

The second new program is called Automotive Service Technology 2 (AST2) and is taught at the Sacramento, California campus. It may also be might be taught at other locations so check the catalog. AST2 is based on the regular automotive repair program, but without the 3 Power & Performance classes listed above, and without 3 additional classes called AD12-102 Introduction to Powertrains AT12-155 Manual Transmissions and AT12-155 Automatic Transmissions. The AST2 program is about $13k cheaper the regular automotive repair program and can be taken without any manufacturer electives. I don't think UTI allows combining the AST2 program with manufacturer electives. but it does allow a student to get a certificate in automotive repair at a greatly reduced cost compared to other UTI programs.

Here are the list of classes required in the 3 different automotive repair programs at UTI:

This is the regular automotive repair program called Automotive Technology 2:

AD12-101 Introduction to Engines
AD12-102 Introduction to Powertrains
AD12-103 Introduction Automotive Physical Science Undercar Systems
AD12-104 Automotive Physical Science Principles: Electrical Fundamentals
AD12-105 Electrical Applications
AT12-150 Power & Performance 1: Engine Build
AT12-151 Power & Performance 2: Bolt-On Performance
AT12-152 Braking Systems
AT12-153 Steering and Suspension Systems
AT12-154 Manual Transmissions
AT12-155 Automatic Transmissions
AD12-156 Technology Principles and Consumer Communication of Automotive HVAC
AD12-157 Advanced Electrical Applications
AT12-201 Introduction to Drivability
AT12-202 Application of Drivability
AT12-203 Power & Performance 3: Computer Performance Tuning
AT12-204 Advanced Technology/Hybrid & Service Advising

This is the Automotive Essentials Technology 2 program:

AD12-101 Introduction to Engines
AD12-102 Introduction to Powertrains
AD12-103 Introduction Automotive Physical Science Undercar Systems
AD12-104 Automotive Physical Science Principles: Electrical Fundamentals
AD12-105 Electrical Applications
AT12-152 Braking Systems
AT12-153 Steering and Suspension Systems
AT12-154 Manual Transmissions
AT12-155 Automatic Transmissions
AD12-156 Technology Principles and Consumer Communication of Automotive HVAC
AD12-157 Advanced Electrical Applications
AT12-201 Introduction to Drivability
AT12-202 Application of Drivability
AT12-204 Advanced Technology/Hybrid & Service Advising

This is the Automotive Service Technology 2 program:

AD12-101 Introduction to Engines
AD12-103 Introduction Automotive Physical Science Undercar Systems
AD12-104 Automotive Physical Science Principles: Electrical Fundamentals
AD12-105 Electrical Applications
AT12-152 Braking Systems
AT12-153 Steering and Suspension Systems
AD12-156 Technology Principles and Consumer Communication of Automotive HVAC
AD12-157 Advanced Electrical Applications
AT12-201 Introduction to Drivability
AT12-202 Application of Drivability
AT12-204 Advanced Technology/Hybrid & Service Advising

UTI campuses are not all the same, so I may have missed something. Make sure to check the catalog for whatever campus your interested in.
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Click on picture to enlarge:
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If you read literature on motorcycle oils from motorcycle and motor oil manufacturers, they all recommend using only motor oil specifically formulated for motorcycles. Mobil Oil list several reasons for this on their website, and here is a copy of their explanation:

It's a little hard to generalize about the difference between Mobil 1 passenger‐car motor oils and Mobil 1™ motorcycle oils. That's because not all viscosities of Mobil 1 passenger‐car oils have the same levels of zinc and phosphorus, and there are even greater differences between the two Mobil 1 motorcycle oils.
  • In general, Mobil 1 motorcycle oils have additive packages formulated for use in both motorcycle engine and transmission operation.
  • For passenger vehicles, fuel economy and emission system protection are higher priorities. These require low phosphorus systems and the use of friction modifiers.
  • Motorcycle oils do not require friction modifiers for fuel economy and for better clutch friction less/no friction modifier is optimum.
  • Motorcycle oils allow the use of higher levels of anti‐wear additives such as ZDDP (phosphorous).
Plus there are the overall benefits of Mobil 1 synthetic oil compared to those of conventional motor oils, whether they be for passenger cars or motorcycles:
   
  • Superior long‐term engine protection
  • Superior high‐temperature stability
  • Excellent low‐temperature starting
  • Outstanding engine performance
  • Low volatility/low oil consumption

Motor oil used in gas powered cars and trucks is designed only for use in the automotive internal combustion engine. Unlike cars and trucks, many motorcycles share engine oil with the transmission and clutch. The Harley Davidson big twin engine is one exception. Harley Davidson does separate engine oil from the clutch and transmission on many models. However, unlike cars and trucks, the Harley big twin engine is mostly air cooled and produces more heat than a car engine. The most used argument for not using automotive motor oil for your motorcycle is it contains friction modifiers that can cause a motorcycle wet clutch to slip under certain conditions, but what are those conditions? Even after knowing the differences found in motor oils, many motorcycle owners choose to use automotive motor oil because its so much cheaper and easier to get.

One individual named Scotty Kerekes aka Scooter Tramp Scotty, has over 1 million miles of experience using automotive motor oil for Harley Davidson motorcycles. In the video below, his Harley Davidson motorcycle is equipped with an Evolution engine and has 507,000 miles. I doubt all those miles are on one engine, but still that's impressive. Scotty not only use's automotive motor oil for the engine, but also for the primary case where the wet clutch is located. Who can argue that the oil he uses is damaging the engine when he has 507,000 miles on the motorcycle? He said in a video he doesn't ride his motorcycle hard, and prefers slower moving back roads to the interstate, so maybe that plays a part in the longevity of his high mileage motorcycle. Is does make you wonder if the selling points used by oil and motorcycle manufactures is a little exaggerated.

If you do the numbers, Scotty pays about $49.56 for 3 quarts (5qt container) of Mobil 1 15W-50 full synthetic motor oil, 1 quart of Mobil 1 15W-90 full synthetic gear oil for the transmission, 1 quart Valvoline 20W-50 conventional oil for the primary case, and an aftermarket oil filter. It cost $84.95 to buy 5 quarts of Harley Davidson Syn 3 20W-50 full synthetic oil (for engine, transmission & primary), 1 Blk Harley Davidson oil filter and an o-ring for the drain plug. Add $3 if you choose a HD chrome oil filter. Scotty saves $35.39 per oil change by using full synthetic aftermarket automotive motor/transmission oil and filters compared to Harley Davidson syn 3 oil and parts. He says he does an oil change every 7000 to 8000 miles, so during his 507,000 miles on the road he saved $2,242.00 - $2,563.00 on oil changes. All motorcycle blended motor oils come with a premium price. It doesn't matter if it's sold by a motorcycle manufacturer or aftermarket and sold on department store shelves; its all more expensive than automotive motor oil.

Even with Scotty's success using car motor oil in his Harley, I don't think I would recommend it for the reasons listed above. Scotty likes to ride his motorcycle real slow, and you could say he babies it. Most motorcycles are high revving, some produce high heat, and many share engine oil with the clutch and transmission. I think the additives added to motorcycle oil make it a better oil for motorcycles, but is it worth the additional cost in the long run? I don't know......

I should mention Harley Davidson does sell a new full synthetic transmission oil called Heavy Synthetic Gear Oil that is more competitively priced with Mobil 1 full synthetic gear oil. Harley also sells a conventional transmission and primary case oil called Formula + Transmission and Primary Chaincase Lubricant. It's about half the price of full synthetic.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/1W1n1Uh5SUM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/1W1n1Uh5SUM</a>
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Small Engine & Motorcycle Repair Schools / Beware Of Student Loans
« Last post by smallengineshop on March 07, 2020, 06:14:32 PM »
I read a post online from a vocational school graduate who said he graduated with $20,000 of student loan debt. He found a job working as a entry level technician with a salary of $14 per hour after graduation. He said with a salary of only $14 per hour he wasn't able to pay his monthly student loan payments and take care of himself and his family at the same time, so he let his student loan payments fall behind. He now has $40,000 of student loan debt.

When you don't make your student loan payments it doesn't go away, it only gets worse. Forget about bankruptcy, because that's not allowed with student loans. If you think you can stop making payments and carry on with life as usual, than think again. Stop making payments and your debt will grow, than the banks will take legal action and garnish your pay checks. The only way out of student loan debt is to pay it off or die

And if you think $14 per hour is a reasonable salary for today's technician, than think again. And also remember that many repair technicians in the transportation industries (cars, motorcycles, trucks, etc) are required to pay for and supply their own tools. To put it in perspective, Walmart Automotive Centers pay their  employees a starting salary of $15 per hour to change tires and oil, and you don't need school or your own tools. The problem with the repair industry is most jobs are only available at a small family owned and operated business, and unfortunately, and far too often, the owner see's the repair shop as a way to make money at the expense of his repair technicians.

If your going to vocational school, or any school for that matter, make sure you can afford it. Be realistic about your entry level income after graduating when you sit down and calculate expenses. Don't get suckered into student loan debt and find yourself a slave to debt for the next 10 to 20 years. Be smart about it. The intentions of whoever concocted the government backed student loan scheme was to do just that; make you a debt slave so they get rich. I think it's usury and should be illegal, but your responsible for signing the dotted line.


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Harley Davidson was one of two motorcycle manufacturers to produce the first motorcycle with final belt drive in 1980. The other manufacturer was Kawasaki. The 1980 Harley Davidson Sturgis model used a belt for both the primary and final drive and was marketed as the first motorcycle with "Twin Belt Drive." The Harley Davidson ad text in 1981 said "The Harley Davidson Sturgis is the first and only stock bike in the world with twin belt drive." The statement is true only because other motorcycle manufacturers were using gears instead of a chain for primary drive and had no reason to change to belt. The 1980 Kawasaki KZ440 was also manufactured with a final belt drive, and was marketing as the "Poly Chain." The Harley Davidson belts were constructed with Kevlar cords and the Kawasaki belt was constructed with aramid fiber cords. I believe Kevlar is also made up of aramid fiber's, but might have a different structure than the fibers used on the Poly Chain belt.

What I find most interesting about the Harley Davidson Sturgis model is I couldn't find any advertisements for the motorcycle until the 1981 model year even though having a final belt drive was a ground breaking achievement. 1980 was a rough time for Harley Davidson and it's parent company AMF, and the Harley Davidson brand was sold in 1981.


Parts diagram for the 1980 Kawasaki KZ440 rear wheel, rear hub, rear brake and final drive belt. Part #33 is the Poly Chain belt.
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Motorcycle General Topics & Repair. Questions. / New Tac/Speedo old gas gauge/ cap
« Last post by Tedd4 on November 29, 2019, 02:06:58 PM »
I am hoping that someone can answer this for me. I am new to the Dyna world after working on sportsters for a long time. I bought a new Tac/Speedo like the one shown in the video that you posted on your Youtube channel. Thanks to the video I have a good feel for how to install mine so THANK YOU...I have one question, once I have installed the new Tac and the fuel gauge is reading as it should, am I okay to remove the old Cap Guage and put something else in its place without losing the functionality on the new Tac? I was thinking about a couple of pop up ones and wanted to make sure that I was good to go with that idea. Thanks for everything!
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Walmart came out with several different motor oils formulated for motorcycles, ATV and UTV vehicles in their Super Tech line. I believe this happened sometime in the last year. There is a 10W40 4-Stroke full synthetic oil and a 20W50 full synthetic oil advertised for motorcycles, and a 10W30 full synthetic for ATV's and side by side vehicles. My local Walmart was out of the motorcycle 20W50 oil, but they did have the 10W40 in stock. See photo's of front and back oil container labels below. The oil was priced at $8.68 per quart. I was surprised to see that 1 quart of Valvoline 20W50 full synthetic oil was almost one dollar cheaper than the 10W40 Super Tech brand.

I wonder if any new Harley Davidson owners would dare trust their engine to Walmart's Super Tech full synthetic 20W50 v-twin motor oil? I doubt it...I'm starting to think if there is more engine wear from using one brand of oil over another its so insignificant that nobody will ever notice. Plus, if insurance stats are correct, most motorcycle owners will never put 30,000 miles on their motorcycle, so why spend the extra dollars for the big brand oils? However, I will never use an oil that isn't certified by API and JASO and meets the standards recommended by the engine manufacturer, except for Harley Davidson oil, which doesn't have the API and JASO ratings, but I know Harley Davidson is not going to sell a terrible motor oil for their motorcycles.

I think I will use the Walmart Super Tech full synthetic 10W40 motorcycle motor oil in my next oil change on the Kawasaki KLR 650. Maybe it would be interesting to record the oil change and post it on YouTube.    :D

Click on image to enlarge:


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I only know of two schools in the country, other than HD's factory training for dealership technicians, that are sponsored/supported by Harley Davidson and offer students the opportunity to earn Harley Davidson PHD certification while in school. The first school is Motorcycle Mechanics Institute, MMI, and the other is Fort Scott Community College, FSCC. Both schools offer a 1 year (two semesters) certificate program, but FSCC also offers a two year associates degree if the student wants to continue with their studies. FSCC Harley Davidson training center is located a mile or two north of Pittsburg, Kansas, and MMI has a campus in Phoenix, Arizona and Orlando, Florida. Both certificate programs at FSCC and MMI prepare students for entry level employment as a Harley Davidson service technician or mechanic.

Both MMI and FSCC offer students help with getting setup for financial aid or student loans/scholarships to pay for school. The tuition cost to attend FSCC as an out-of-state student is $117 (includes fees) per credit hour, or $102 (includes fees) if the student is a resident of Bourbon County and $105 (includes fees) if the student is a Kansas resident but lives in another county. Total credit hours needed for the FSCC Harley Davidson certificate is 33 credit hours, which makes total tuition cost $3861. Total credit hours at FSCC for the AS degree is 60 credit hours making total tuition cost for an out-of-state student $7020. Tuition to attend MMI's Harley Davidson Late Model program with no electives or fees is $19,450.

Both MMI and FSCC have additional costs for their respective Harley Davidson technician training programs. MMI has a registration fee of $50, Lab fee of $95 and a Meter fee of $120, making tuition cost $19,715. FSCC has a program fee of $725 per semester, but I think the student only pays this fee for two semesters even if they continue on for an AS degree, which is 4 or 5 semesters. MMI provides students with hand tools need to complete the program. FSCC requires students to provide their own tools. FSCC does offer a Harley Davidson tool kit for $3780, but I don't know what tools or what brand tools are included with this kit, but I'm 99 percent sure the student can get tools on their own for a lower cost; probably around $500. The plus side of having to buy your own tools is being able to take them with you when you graduate.

MMI offer's two electives for Harley Davidson students. The first elective is a performance class teaching students about the Harley Davidson performance line of products and how to use a Dyno. The cost for this class is $1400. The second elective is a early model class that teaches students how to repair early model Harley Davidson motorcycles; everything from Knuckleheads to the Evolution engine. The cost for the early model elective is $2800. Remember, these classes are electives and must be taken with the core training program. I don't think FSCC offers an elective Harley Davidson training class. Every Harley Davidson technician training class at FSCC is included in the core training program.

Both MMI and FSCC offer assistance with student housing. MMI uses a 3rd party to help students find apartment's near the MMI campus. FSCC offers dorms or apartments on campus where students can rent by the semester. FSCC also offers a food/meal program that offers 10 or 19 meals per week for 1 semester depending on which meal program the student purchases.

Classes start dates are every 6 weeks at MMI, so new students won't have to wait longer than 6 weeks to start the program. FSCC start dates are at the beginning of the fall and spring semester in August and January.

Whatever school you decide to attend, make sure you sit down and calculate how much money you need through student loans and how much your student loan payment will be and for how long. Also find out how much you can expect to make as a entry level motorcycle mechanic. The salary for a motorcycle technician depends on your location. The median salary for a motorcycle mechanics in Kansas is $29,314. That means 50 percent of motorcycle mechanics in Kansas are making more than that, and the other 50 percent are making less. That doesn't leave much money left over for student loan payments. You can't claim bankruptcy on a student loan, and if you try to run and hide from the lender, they will find you and garnish your pay checks. The only way out of student loan debt is to either pay it off or die. Be frugal while attending school! Nobody will care what school you attended after you have a few years of experience. These schools are only meant to give you the skills needed for an entry level technician position.

Here are links to FSCC and MMI

Fort Scott Community College Harley Davidson Technician Training Program

Motorcycle Mechanic Institute
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Click for good information about school cost and student loan payments




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