Motorcycles > 1987 - 2018, 2022 Kawasaki KLR 650

How Has My KLR Survived?

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smallengineshop:
I just heard the new 2022 KLR 650 models still use the same balancer chain system and parts used on KLR 650's from 2008 to 2018, which means the 'Doohickey' problem, a word coined by the KLR community to describe idler shaft and spring breakage/damage from a supposedly flawed system, is now a topic of conversation for the new 2022 KLR 650 models. At least it is by aftermarket accessory retailers for KLR's.

KLR forums talk about the 'Doohickey' problem as a pressing issue that must be addressed immediately or you will end up with a damaged KLR costing thousands to repair. I've even witnessed someone say they wouldn't buy a KLR because the 'Doohickey' and "Therma Bob' repair is mandatory and they didn't want to be bothered with it. Therma Bob was another KLR community repair that for some reason isn't as popular as it's cousin Doohickey, and another recommended repair that I failed to do on my KLR. I think the consensus among KLR forums is KLR's are very reliable, but inherently flawed with these problems that I don't think Kawasaki has ever recognized.

I managed to put 35,000 miles on my KLR and I haven't even taken the left side cover off to view the chain balancer idler shaft and spring. How has my 2009 KLR been able to survive so long? Maybe I have a four leaf clover stuck somewhere on the bike giving it the ability to beat the odds. Another amazing story comes from Gregory Frazier, a guy who used his red KLR 650 to tour the world but failed to 'Doohickey' his 50,000 mile KLR before he gave it away. I'm sure his KLR must be sitting in a junk yard by now with a sign that says "Died from lack of Doohickey."

Anyway, I will update this forum if something happens to my KLR. Going for a ride.....

https://www.youtube.com/v/vFv_GmIyNdE

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