Inside a STP S6607 Oil Filter For Automotive And Motorcycle Use

  • By George
  • December 15, 2016
  • Comments Off on Inside a STP S6607 Oil Filter For Automotive And Motorcycle Use

STP S6607 Oil Filter and box. I didn’t realize I was photographing the Spanish language side of the box. A picture of the English version is listed below.

Right off the bat I can tell you I would not recommend this oil filter because it only has a 93 percent efficiency rating. Its too easy to find a low cost FRAM Extra Guard oil filter with a higher efficiency rating of 95 percent. The 93 percent efficiency rating means the oil filter traps 93 percent of particles 20 micron or larger using ISO 4548-12 test method. For those of you who don’t know what a micron is, 1 micron is 1 millionth of a meter or 39 millionths of an inch. This is a low end, low cost oil filter and I paid $4.49 for one at Autozone. I was curious how the STP oil filter construction compared with the FRAM PH6017A motorcycle filter. Both filters are recommended for a 2012 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic according to the Autozone and FRAM application guides, although they don’t cross reference one another. STP says the S6607 is equivalent to a FRAM PH6607, but FRAM recommends a PH6017A oil filter and not a PH6607 for a 2012 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic. The FRAM PH6017A and PH6607 are very similar and look identical, but the filter specifications for each filter are slightly different. It would be nice if the specifications for a FRAM PH6607 were identical to a PH6017A, because the PH6607 is available in FRAM Tough Guard and Ultra Synthetic line which have a 99 percent efficiency rating. Anyway, back to the STP S6607. The internal parts of the STP S6607 are a bypass valve, nitrile rubber drain back valve, 46 pleat paper filter element, metal end caps, metal crush sleeve and outer oil filter shell as seen in the photo’s. I like how the STP S6607 uses metal end caps for the paper filter element, but the fit between the bypass valve and metal end cap is very sloppy. There is roughly .03″ or 0.8mm of side to side movement which doesn’t lend to creating a tight seal between the end cap and bypass valve. This has the potential of allowing motor oil to escape between the bypass valve and metal end cap and avoid passing through the paper filter element. The paper filter element pleats are not evenly spaced in areas, and the filter uses a nitrile drain back valve, both of which are common in low end filters. Silicon drain back valves perform better in extreme temperatures than the nitrile valves, but are only found in more expensive and better performing oil filters. STP recommends replacing this oil filter every 3 months or to follow your vehicle manufacturers recommendation.

Having a nitrile drain back valve and uneven paper filter pleats is not surprising and are common features for low end oil filters. The side to side movement between the bypass valve and metal end cap, and the lower efficiency rating are two good reasons not to use the STP S6607 oil filter. If your auto parts store application guide calls for a STP S6607, or if they use this filter with a discount oil change kit, you would be better off changing to a FRAM PH6607, or upgrading to a FRAM Tough Guard or Synthetic Guard filter. Whatever filter brand you choose to use always check the brand application guide for the correct oil filter for your vehicle. All major brand oil filters should meet your vehicle warranty requirements, but you must use the filter(s) specified for your vehicle, or even better, use a OEM oil filter. Two different oil filters can appear identical, but have different internal parts and different specifications, so never assume two identical oil filters are also interchangeable.

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The STP Oil Filter S6607 paper filter element and metal end caps. You can see how unevenly spaced the paper filter pleats are, but this is common with low end oil filters.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 paper filter element, end caps and the glue used to attach the end cap to the paper filter.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 paper filter element and metal end caps. This paper filter element has 46 pleats.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 metal end cap and metal crush sleeve. The bypass valve fits into this end cap.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 metal end cap and metal crush sleeve. The nitrile drain back valve attaches to this end cap.

The internal side of the STP Oil Filter S6607 base plate.

The internal STP Oil Filter S6607 parts. From top left to right: bypass valve, paper filter element with metal end caps, oil filter housing, nitrile drain back valve and base plate.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 nitrile drain back valve.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 nitrile drain back valve attached to the internal side of the base plate.

The spring side of the STP Oil Filter S6607 bypass valve. Notice how much this bypass valve looks like the bypass valve’s used in FRAM oil filters.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 bypass valve with the spring compressed and the bypass valve open.

The STP Oil Filter S6607 bypass valve opposite the side with the bypass spring.

Another view of the STP Oil Filter S6607 bypass valve and where it fits into the paper filter end cap.

STP Oil Filter S6607 bypass valve and where it fits into the filter paper end cap. There was a lot of play between the bypass valve and end cap. Roughly .03″ or 0.8mm.

Just another view of the STP Oil Filter S6607 box.

STP Oil Filter S6607 main English description on the box.

STP Oil Filter S6607 English description on the side of the box.

STP Oil Filter S6607 outer side of the base plate. You can see the base plate has 6 small holes for the motor oil to enter the oil filter.

STP Oil Filter S6607 internal parts assembled, and how it is constructed inside the filter housing

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